Third Meeting of the ECJJ - Introduction

Third Meeting of the ECJJ

Presentation

Following the Fifth Biennial Conference of the International Juvenile Justice Observatory, the European Council for Juvenile Justice (ECJJ) met in London and for the third time on November 7 and 8, 2012. Created to foster juvenile justice without borders at a European level, the European Council met in London, with the support of the Youth Justice Board of England and Wales, to discuss its forthcoming initiatives as well as the consequences of the financial, economic, social and political crises on juvenile justice systems throughout Europe.

After a first round of meetings by section in 2009 and an all-section meeting in 2010 in Rome, the members of the European Council for Juvenile Justice met for the third time in November 2012. Held in London, this meeting dealt with different current issues such as the future of the European Council or the consequences of the economic situation for juvenile justice systems.

During this Meeting, the IJJO reiterated its will and dedication to fostering greater communication and coordination amongst juvenile justice professionals throughout Europe. To this extent, the IJJO underlined the upcoming launch of an Intranet available to all ECJJ members as well as the publication of a website devoted entirely to the European Council for Juvenile Justice. The latter will, among others, emphasize the work undertaken by the Council, introduce its members, and present the different ECJJ meetings.

Besides, the third Meeting of the ECJJ was the opportunity for its members to discuss the consequences of the financial, economic, social and political crises on juvenile justice systems in their respective country. Their feedback will be the core of an upcoming publication, which should not only provide an overview of the crises repercussions throughout Europe but also a series of recommendations on how to ensure the best possible juvenile justice systems in times of crises.

The IJJO hopes this publication will help understand the aftermath of the crises as well as foster efficient, and yet effective, juvenile justice systems throughout the twenty-seven members of the European Union.

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